Tag Archives: X70

Fujifilm XT20 + Voigtlander 58mm f 1.4 (and bounce flash) for portraits

There’s no doubt the Fujifilm XT20 is an incredible camera, both in terms of use and output. It’s small, lightweight, powerful and versatile. So too is the phenomenal Voigtlander 58mm f1.4 lens. Compared with many other 50mm lenses I own/have owned/have shot with, this is one of the best autofocus 50mm IMO. It’s manual focus, so you need to be confident of shooting with and EVF and focus peaking (or similar aid).

I decided to take a few very quick portraits with the Fujifilm XT20,Voigtlander 58mm f1.4 and a LightPix Labs flash (manual only no TTL so all the settings must be set physically. The flash was bounced off the ceiling and the shutter speed was 1/125, aperture was f2.8 and ISO 1000. I use auto-ISO on Fujifilm cameras as you can program the minimum and maximum across 3 custom settings. Flash setting were at 1/16. No face tracking was available as its manual focus, however I did you focus peaking with the red option. And yes, children move and it takes some time and skill to nail focus.

Below are a series of colour and B&W shots. All were shot RAW in LR so no simulations were used, except for the first B&W which was ACROS + G filter. Click on photos for bigger. Enjoy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Plastic and Light

I’m at home trying to overcome a really bad cold so I challenged myself to shoot a quick abstract. Used XT1 and 16mm f1.4 shooting a plastic water bottle from a low angle backlit by a window and slight frontlit from an iphone LED. I love how the 16mm allows you to get up and really close. 2 pictures, one color and one mono. Processes in Iridient Developer and mono then processed in SiverEfx Pro – part of Nik Collection.

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Fujifilm XT10 with adapted Minolta MC Tele Rokkor 135mm f3.5 – processed Iridient Developer

I’ve become quite interested in the manual focus vintage lens craze sweeping the mirrorless camera genre. After reading several articles online and visiting some Flickr pages (although they are few and far between for vintage lenses), I decided to see what all the hype was about. After researching the market via eBay for several weeks I decided upon my sixth purchase…..the Minolta MC Tele Rokkor 135mm f3.5 lens with an adapter to mount on my XT10. This particular lens was released in the late 80’s comprising of 4 elements in 4 groups, aperture from f3.5 to f22, minimum focus distance of 1.5m, made of metal with metal mount and weighing about 450g. This is actually a small lens for its focal distance.

When the lens arrived it was in immaculate condition, just as the seller had promised – phew. Many old lenses like this one can often have nasty fungus, haze and scratch surprises so you need to shop carefully from people who have good a good seller rating and have experience in selling and rating lenses. Generally sellers from Japan and Germany are highly trusted and value their feedback fiercely. This one I bought from a seller in Japan.

The lens was quite easy to mount onto the camera, and I lucked out on a K&F Concept adapter also on eBay – highly recommend as solid and a snug fit. It’s important to remember to switch the camera over to “use without lens” in the menu otherwise it won’t work. There is no auto focus. Scary huh! Well after some practice you can learn to focus quickly thanks to the XT10’s focus peaking. Really it doesn’t take all that long. A word of caution – you will need quite a lot of practice to nail the focus for moving subjects….and for moving subjects I’d still prefer to use Fuji’s excellent AF lens lineup. But I suppose you could set your aperture to say f8 and use a fast shutter speed for capturing fast street shots, just like zone focussing.

So why bother? These older lenses are heavier because I believe there’s lead in the glass….so what? Well lead is a supposedly a great conductor of light and colour to the sensor that you cannot find in modern lenses. This theoretically means you get finer detail and more nostalgic colours – to my eye anyway. Secondly the cost. This lenses was about $50 AUD. Some you’ll find cheaper, you may even luck out at garage sales or pawn brokers and find a bargain. Thirdly they are small and easy to focus. The focus throw is firm without being tight, and easily manipulated between the thumb and index finger for smooth operation. Thirdly less elements in less groups = less possibly of light being distorted through the lens.

Without further ado here’s some sample shots. The Minolta MC Tele Rokkor 135mm f3.5 renders reasonably sharp, but its real strength is its colour rendition. I’m not going to list the EXIF data because the aperture won’t register (no electronic connection) and the pictures speaks for themselves. All processed raw files in Iridient Developer – OMG the best Fuji raw converter I’ve used. If you shoot Fuji raw files you must get Iridient Developer, just sharp detail. Click pictures for larger view. It’s miserable weather here today so the pictures were all low light at higher ISO’s thus more noise. Enjoy.

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Fuji XT10 with adapted Minolta MC Rokkor 55mm f1.7 – processed in Iridient Developer

I’ve become quite interested in the manual focus vintage lens craze sweeping the mirrorless camera genre. After reading several articles online and visiting some Flickr pages (although they are few and far between for vintage lenses), I decided to see what all the hype was about. After researching the market via eBay for several weeks I decided upon my third purchase…..the Minolta MC Rokkor 55mm f1.7 lens with an adapter to mount on my XT10. This particular lens was released at the beginning of 1966 comprising of 6 elements in 6 groups, aperture from f1.7 to f16, minimum focus distance of 85cm, made of metal with metal mount and weighing about 230g.

When the lens arrived it was in immaculate condition, just as the seller had promised – phew. Many old lenses like this one can often have nasty fungus, haze and scratch surprises so you need to shop carefully from people who have good a good seller rating and have experience in selling and rating lenses. Generally sellers from Japan and Germany are highly trusted and value their feedback fiercely.

The lens was quite easy to mount onto the camera, and I lucked out on a K&F Concept adapter also on eBay – highly recommend as solid and a snug fit. Its important to remember to switch the camera over to “use without lens” in the menu otherwise it won’t work. There is no auto focus. Scary huh! Well after some practice you can learn to focus quickly thanks to the XT10’s focus peaking. Really it doesn’t take all that long. A word of caution – you will need quite a lot of practice to nail the focus for moving subjects….and for moving subjects I’d still prefer to use Fuji’s excellent AF lens lineup. But I suppose you could set your aperture to say f8 and use a fast shutter speed for capturing fast street shots, just like zone focussing.

So why bother? These older lenses are heavier because I believe there’s lead in the glass….so what? Well lead is a supposedly a great conductor of light and colour to the sensor that you cannot find in modern lenses. This theoretically means you get finer detail and more nostalgic colours – to my eye anyway. Secondly the cost. This lenses was about $139 AUD. Some you’ll find cheaper, you may even luck out at garage sales or pawn brokers and find a bargain. Thirdly they are small and easy to focus. The focus throw is firm without being tight, and easily manipulated between the thumb and index finger for smooth operation.

Without further ado here’s some sample shots. This Minolta MC Rokkor 55mm f1.7 lens is incredibly sharp and renders beautifully. I’m not going to list the EXIF data because the aperture won’t register (no electronic connection) and the pictures speaks for themselves. All processed raw files in Iridient Developer – OMG the best Fuji raw converter I’ve used. On camera flash used for fill. Click pictures for larger view. Enjoy.

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Fuji XT10 with adapted Canon FD 85mm f1.8

I’ve become quite interested in the manual focus vintage lens craze sweeping the mirrorless camera genre. After reading several articles online and visiting some Flickr pages (although they are few and far between for vintage lenses), I decided to see what all the hype was about. After researching the market via eBay for several weeks I decided upon my second purchase…..the Canon 85mm f1.8 lens with an adapter to mount on my XT10. This particular lens was released at the beginning of 1979 comprising of 6 elements in 4 groups, aperture from f1.8 to f22, minimum focus distance of 85cm, made of plastic with metal mount and weighing about 345g.

When the lens arrived it was in immaculate condition, just as the seller had promised – phew. Many old lenses like this one can often have nasty fungus, haze and scratch surprises so you need to shop carefully from people who have good a good seller rating and have experience in selling and rating lenses. Generally sellers from Japan are highly trusted and value their feedback fiercely.

The lens was quite easy to mount onto the camera, and I lucked out on a K&F Concept adapter also on eBay – highly recommend as solid and a snug fit. Its important to remember to switch the camera over to “use without lens” in the menu otherwise it won’t work. There is no auto focus. Scary huh! Well after some practice you can learn to focus quickly thanks to the XT10’s focus peaking. Really it doesn’t take all that long. A word of caution – you will need quite a lot of practice to nail the focus for moving subjects….and for moving subjects I’d still prefer to use Fuji’s excellent AF lens lineup. But I suppose you could set your aperture to say f8 and use a fast shutter speed for capturing fast street shots, just like zone focussing.

So why bother? These older lenses are heavier because I believe there’s lead in the glass….so what? Well lead is a supposedly a great conductor of light and colour to the sensor that you cannot find in modern lenses. This theoretically means you get finer detail and more nostalgic colours – to my eye anyway. Secondly the cost. This lenses was about $380 AUD. Some you’ll find cheaper, you may even luck out at garage sales or pawn brokers and find a bargain. Thirdly they are small and easy to focus. The focus throw is firm without being tight, and easily manipulated between the thumb and index finger for smooth operation.

Without further ado here’s some sample shots. I’m not going to list the EXIF data because the aperture won’t register (no electronic connection) and the picture speaks for itself. All SOOC jpegs, no editing. Click for larger view. Enjoy.

UPDATE – please check images at the bottom that have been processed in Iridient Developer

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The shots below have been edited in Iridient Developer rather than Lightroom and I think they look better. Tried Iridient for Fuji files and its unbelievable how good it is – highly recommend

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34 sample shots with Fuji XT10 with old vintage Canon 28mm f2.8 manual focus + adapter

I’ve become quite interested in the manual focus vintage lens craze sweeping the mirrorless camera genre. After reading several articles online and visiting some Flickr pages (although they are few and far between for vintage lenses), I decided to see what all the hype was about. After researching the market via eBay for several weeks I decided upon my first purchase…..the Canon 28mm f2.8 lens with an adapter to mount on my XT10.This particular lens was released at the beginning of 1975 comprising of 7 elements in 7 groups, aperture from f2.8 to f22, minimum focus distance of 33cm, made of plastic and weighing about 230g.

When the lens arrived it was in immaculate condition, just as the seller had promised – phew. Many old lenses like this one can often have nasty fungus, haze and scratch surprises so you need to shop carefully from people who have good a good seller rating and have experience in selling and rating lenses. Generally sellers from Japan are highly trusted and value their feedback fiercely.

The lens was quite easy to mount onto the camera, and I lucked out on a K&F Concept adapter also on eBay – highly recommend as solid and a snug fit. Its important to remember to switch the camera over to “use without lens” in the menu otherwise it won’t work. There is no auto focus. I repeat – there is no auto focus. This is manual. Scary huh! Well after some practice you can learn to focus quickly thanks to the XT10’s focus peaking. Really it doesn’t take all that long. A word of caution – you will need quite a lot of practice to nail the focus for moving subjects….and for moving subjects I’d still prefer to use Fuji’s excellent AF lens lineup, of which I have 5 to date. But I suppose you could set your aperture to say f8 and use a fast shutter speed for capturing fast street shots, just like zone focussing.

So why bother? These older lenses are heavier because I believe there’s lead in the glass….so what? Well lead is a supposedly a great conductor of light and colour to the sensor that you cannot find in modern lenses. This theoretically means you get finer detail and more nostalgic colours – to my eye anyway. Secondly the cost. These lenses are about $100 AUD each. Some you’ll find cheaper, you may even luck out at garage sales or pawn brokers and find a bargain. Thirdly they are small and easy to focus. The focus throw is firm without being tight, and easily manipulated between the thumb and index finger for smooth operation.

Without further ado here’s some sample shots. I’m not going to list all the EXIF data because the aperture won’t register (no electronic connection) and the pictures speak for themselves. Most of these were raw files processed in Lightroom. Click any of them for larger view. Enjoy.

P.S. I have since acquired 5 more vintage lenses, a combination of Canon, Minolta and Carl Zeiss. Hope to get time to post more reviews and pictures soon.

 

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Fuji XT10 portraits with 35mm f1.4 + 55-200mm all jpeg in low light

Fuji jpegs are incredibly useful, especially when you’re just shooting for the family trying to capture a moment. Here are some pictures taken with the XT10 + 35mm f1.4 or 55-200mm. All shots taken indoors with limited light and only slightly edited in Lightroom. Yes I would use raw +jpeg for low light and important pictures to allow a broad scope for my exposure mistakes. Enjoy. Click any picture for bigger.

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XT10 + 35mm 1/250 f2.8 at 3200 with 35mm f1.4 – nice how well Fuji jpegs hold up at high ISO’s

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1/250 f4.2 (probably too narrow – should have been 6.3) ISO 3200 jpeg on 55-200mm

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1/250 f1.7 ISO 3200 jpeg 55-200mm – again very limited editing in Lightroom – shot using Fuji film simulation B&W+G

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1/160 f1.4 ISO 800 with 35mm f1.4 jpeg edited slightly in Lightroom. Notice how sharp this lens is at f1.4!!!!

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35mm f1.4 etc